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One of the fair Sex,
The Court and City Vagaries (London, J. Baker [1711]).

One of the fair Sex, Court and City Vagaries (London, J. Baker [1711]).

THE| Court and City| VAGARIES,| OR| INTRIGUES,| OF| BOTH SEXES.| [rule]| Written by one of the fair Sex.| [rule]| LONDON,| Printed: And Sold by J. Baker, at the| Black Boy in Pater-Noster-Row.| Price Six-Pence.

Description

p.[1] titlepage/ p.[3-4] "To the Author"/ p.5-52/ 8.

Shelf-markslink

{NA:MH-H: EC/A100.711c7}.

Bibliographical Reference

ESTC: n004154.

History of Publication
  1. this editionThe Court and City Vagaries (London: J. Baker [1711]). [Date of Publication: Advertised in Spectator, 255, (22 Dec. 1711).] Microfilm: RP: reel 1009, no. 61. Reprint ed. M. F. Shugrue (New York/ London, 1973).
  2. [...] the second part (London: J. Baker [1712]). [Date of Publication: Advertised in: Spectator 426, (9 July 1712).]link
Remarks

Preface by an anonymous male voice adresses and criticises the Author "Idalia" who did not tell what she was up to (and who could have spared some of the moral sentiments)

Fife short narrations. The Author stating again and again that everything happened in her vicinity. The first narration ends with the promise to be continued as soon as new information reaches the author. Stylistically non professional - tenses change contnuously. (1.) Aminda and Ciladira on a walk through London: a man treats the ladies with ice cream and expects a physical recompensation. (2.) An Afternoon (of the narrator) with lady Tuneal, witty sketch of the elderly spinster's character. (3.) With irony: a flirt of the virtuous narrator (from window to window across the street) with a man - who does not answer the narrator's feelings - feelings the narrator herself vainly denies. (4.) Two frustrated married women at a tavern: gallant Newlove brings them into trouble. (5) An old member of parliament falls in love with a girl passing by. The love letter he sends her reaches an old seamstress, which brings our man into a peculiar situation.

o.s.